Cultural rights for everyone.

issue 58

Hello folks

Welcome to issue 58 of Blue Notes.

It was really great to meet many of you again last Wednesday at the Family Support Network Conference and hear of your work, which by all accounts seems to be the busiest time of year in many FRC’s.

Are you making, exhibiting, performing, writing this autumn? Could you add something extra to your local activity to mark the UN International Day for the Eradication of Poverty which takes place on October 17th? The idea is to make visible that FRC's and other community groups are not receiving their share of public arts resources that comes through the Local Authority, Arts Council and CREATE. If you haven’t already signed the Petition you can do so at bluedrum@eircom.net

You can contact Gillian Keogan on 01 8771446 or bluedrum@ireland.com

All the best for now
Gillian Keogan, Projects Support Leader

 

UN Day for the Eradication of Poverty
October 17, 2011 [Monday] from 11am to 4pm.
European Parliament Offices, 43, Molesworth Street, Dublin 2

Registration is necessary! Email blue.drum@yahoo.com or call and leave your name and contact details at 01- 877 1446. Drinks will be provided. Since costs for the event are not covered and there is no registration fee we ask people to bring sandwiches and/or biscuits.

CONTENTS:

1. What’s being attempted?
2. How it will work
3. Why now?
4. Who is involved?

 

1. What’s being attempted?

A day of public actions – to create awareness about cultural rights

o Making connections to other people who are interested in the cultural rights of families and communities

o Community Arts - deepening the idea of artists and non-artists working together in the community

o Activist stories - a platform to listen to first-hand accounts and reports

 

 

Act 1: Meditation on Silence: Risking our loss of sovereignty

(after George Bataille)
11.00am - 11.45am
Facilitator: Ed Carroll

Act 2: Open Space Circles
11.45am – 12.30pm.
Facilitator: Suzanne Bosch
Involving practical planning exercise for a public journey where we will consider 3 themes:
- How can families and communities make sense of Ireland today?
- How effective is the State spending on community arts?
- How can artists and non-artists work together to benefit communities?

Act 3: Public Performative Journey. It will involve a walk, which will begin at the EU Parliament Office and include the handing over of a Community Arts Petition at the Arts Council and the Department of Arts, Culture and the Gaeltacht.

Act 4: Proposition Circle* - Developing ideas for future actions to link the local and global

2.45pm – 4.00pm

Jessica Carson (Mayfield Community Arts Centre)*tbc
Conor Shields / Jo Egan (Community Arts Partnership, Belfast)
Sandy Fitzgerald (Engine Room Europe)
Choctaw Gary Whitedeer (Afri)*tbc
Ruairí McKiernan (founder SpunOut)* tbc
Niall Crowley (Re-Claiming Our Future)
Rita Fagan / John Bissett (Spectacle of Defiance)*tbc
*These individuals are not yet confirmed.

3. Why now?

There is only space here to outline the short story of A New Pact. Beginning in Fatima Mansions in 2010 we were ninety people and in 2011, in Thomond Park, Limerick, there many more. Last June, eighteen people from across the country took part in the Take Back the Power weekend, facilitated by Suzanne Bosch. It was there that the challenge of cultural rights came to the fore and how it can link to attempts to re-set the island of Ireland.

Blue Drum works in the context of families and Family Resource Centres (www.familyresource.ie) but for A New Pact we are participating with others interested in collective actions in the area of cultural rights. Of course, the group is actively seeking others, too, who care about community arts, poverty and human rights and the contribution of creativity and arts.

Ten years ago, the Combat Poverty Agency identified the need for an arts agency to support young people, families and communities in poverty because community arts was a means to have a voice; having a voice meant making that voice heard and having that cultural voice listened to.

There is only space here to outline the short story of A New Pact. Beginning in Fatima Mansions in 2010 we were ninty people and in 2011 in Thomond Park, Limerick there were almost 300 of us. Last June, eighteen people from across the country took part in the Initiators Open Space weekend, facilitated by Suzanne Bosch. It was there that the challenge of cultural rights came to the fore in the context of attempts to re-set the island of Ireland.

Blue Drum works in the context of families and Family Resource Centres (www.familyresource.ie) but for A New Pact we are participating with others interested in collective actions in the area of the cultural rights. Of course, the group is actively seeking others too who care about community arts, poverty and human rights and the contribution of creativity and arts.

Ten years ago, the Combat Poverty Agency identified the need for an arts agency to support young people, families and communities in poverty because community arts was a means to have a voice; having a voice meant making that voice heard and having that cultural voice listened to.

4. Who is involved?

Organisation: Blue Drum, Clann Family Resource Centre, Cork Community Art Link, Gradcam, European Anti-Poverty Network, Mayfield Arts, New Belfast Arts, Afri

Individual: Anne O’Shaughnessy, Galway, Conor Shields, Belfast , Dave Hederman, Belfast, Ed Carroll, Dublin, Eleanor Phillips, Wicklow, Grainne Lord, Dublin, Fiona Woods, Clare, Glenn Loughran, Dublin, Hermann Marbe, Cork, Imelda Clarke, Dublin, Jean Bates, Dublin, Jean Bridgeman, Dublin, Jessica Carson, Cork, Jo Egan, Belfast, Leonora O’Halloran, Galway, Mick Wilson, Dublin, Niall Crowley, Dublin, Pam Buchanan, Dublin, Paul Maher, Dublin, Paul Ginnell, Dublin, John Mulloy, Mayo, Joe Murray, Dublin, Roisin Markam, Wexford, Sandy Fitzgerald, Dublin, Suzanne Bosch, Belfast, Vukasin Nedljkovic, Serbia/Dublin,William Frode de la Foret, Cork, Andrew Carroll, Dublin; Lisa Crowne, Galway; Chris Maguire, Dublin.

 

 

 

 

Sign

Community Arts Petition


In 2010 the Arts Council received €68 million, €65 million from the national lottery. The national lottery revenue is gathered from lower socio-economic groups, unskilled workers, the unemployed and those with lower educational qualifications so who is paying for the arts? Is it like the banking transfer of artistic wealth from the less well off to subsidise the better off and the better artistically to be able to avail?

(...)using their money from the Lotto, walk the arts into thorns and into places unknown and unnoticed. When in doubt, Minister, and without money, be brave and build a castle. 

Extract from Senator Marie Louise O'Donnell to the Seanad Debate on Arts and Culture (21/9/2011):

 

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